What should an Interaction Design degree look like?

workshop – 90 min | Feb 4 – 15:00

Workshop goal: To explore ways in which Interaction Design can better leverage the existing resources of higher education and, at the same time, identify ways to legitimize and formalize the field within the slow-moving taxonomic structures of the academy.

Industrial Design programs are often housed either in a college/school of engineering, architecture, or fine art; cognitive psychology is housed in Arts and Sciences; computer science is either taught from an engineering or mathematics home. This autonomy makes is difficult to form a foundation within the academy. The workshop is developed to explore three specific problem areas between existing higher education structures and the pace and breath that is a defining characteristic of IxD.

Main Points of discussion in this workshop: 1: Developing IxD degree programs and specific classes that address the constant state of flux that characterizes Interaction Design without requiring constant re-writing of curriculum.

2: How can the self-regulation and peer review academic research output be better developed to foster communication and debate within the field of IxD. Faculty tenure/promotion as well as undergraduate research will be addressed.

3: While autonomy within a University/College can be positive the lack of faculty lines and the financial security of more established academic programs is lacking. What are some ways that IxD can define itself to better work within higher education?

Denise A Heckman

Denise A Heckman
Syracuse University School of Design

About the speaker

Denise A Heckman

Denise A Heckman

Syracuse University School of Design
Denise A Heckman is currently the coordinator of the Industrial and Interaction Program at Syracuse University. She teaches classes on interface design and the communication of complex ideas and holds a BFA from The Kansas City Art Institute and an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art.   Before joining Syracuse University, Heckman began her career at Hallmark Cards and moved to Seattle during the first technology start-up boom in the mid 2000’s.

Subscribe to newsletter

Keep me informed

Code of Conduct   —   Copyright 2004 › 2018 Interaction Design Association   —   Credits